Pedigree Or Moggy?

So you are going to get a cat, but have you decided whether you should get a purebred pedigree or a mixed moggy? Pedigree cats and moggy cats have become incredibly diverse over the last couple of decades, and it’s a very exciting time to choose a unique breed that suits your family lifestyle. Breeders have been able to refine pedigree cat breeds and even produce new ones with particularly interesting features like the Serengeti with an incredible wild like coat pattern.


A moggy tabby cat lying down on the carpet with its paws stretched out
A moggy tabby cat lying down on the carpet with its paws stretched out

Choosing one of these many incredible pets can be a little daunting, but don’t panic - use our useful cat directory to narrow down your search. You can compare a huge collection of cat images and find out useful information for each breed.

Below are the pros and cons of both pedigree cats and moggies to help you make the decision a little easier.


Pedigree

There is a huge variety of breeds to choose from and each one has its own distinct look and personality traits. If you know what you want your cat to look like and have an idea of the ideal personality you would like, then you can narrow down your search to a handful of breeds.


A Pedigree British Shorthair Cat relaxing on the arm of the sofa
A Pedigree British Shorthair Cat relaxing on the arm of the sofa

Each pedigree cat has a few different coat colours and patterns - colourpoint, tabby, and tortie are the most common. Use our cat directory to search through each pedigree cat breed and find out all of their coat colour variations.

If you would like to find out more about cat coat types and colours read our section here.

In general, pedigree cats are more affectionate and friendlier than moggies. This is because pedigree cats have been selectively bred for desirable traits. Over many generations the characteristics that are preferred become more consistent and eventually become part of the breeds identity.

Choosing a pedigree cat reduces the risk of getting a cat with an undesirable temperament. If it is an adult cat then you can get an idea of its temperament before you buy it, and if it is a kitten then you can usually meet both parents to judge whether they have good temperaments.

The only downside to getting a pedigree cat is the cost. Pedigree cats or kittens can be very expensive but it is important to realise that it can sometimes be worth spending the money, and this cost is relatively low compared to the annual upkeep of a cat. If the price is a little too steep for you then think about adopting a pedigree cat or kitten who has had a previous home.


Moggy

Moggies come in all shapes, sizes and colours. You can have a very strikingly coloured or patterned cat that is still a moggy. This can make the decision on which moggy to get as hard as deciding that you want a moggy in the first place.

Two beautiful moggy cats sat on a window ledge
Two beautiful moggy cats sat on a window ledge

One clear reason to get a moggy is the reduced risk of health problems. The variation in their genetics means moggies tend to be healthier, stronger and more intelligent than their purebred cousins.

Of course some moggies will be unlucky with diseases and some purebreds will live a full life disease free but the risk of disease is reduced in moggies.

Moggies generally make better outdoor cats than pedigree cats. Being more intelligent and stronger than most pedigree cats, a moggy will usually have enough independence to be happy outside for large portions of the day.

It is also fair to say that Moggies and non-pedigree cats have a longer average life expectancy than pedigree cats, but this doesn’t mean to say that pedigree cats can’t live a long and happy life.


A black and white bicolour moggy cat
A black and white bicolour moggy cat

A downside to moggies is that they can be more unpredictable than pedigree cats. Due to their wide gene pool you will often get kittens in the same litter that have completely different temperaments. This can mean that a kitten may grow into an angry and aggressive cat even if their parents were well behaved and lovely.



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